Tag Archives: Small Press Big Stories

Book Review: The Sea-Stone Sword

The Sea-Stone Sword by Joel Cornah
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

All Rob Sardon wants, more than anything else in the world, is to be a hero. He wants the world to know his name, to revere his name and for songs to be sung of his exploits even after he is long gone. So when he is sent to live with his uncle in far off Khamas he begins a journey that will see him go from being a naive, thirteen year old boy to something more. Just maybe not the hero he imagines himself to be.

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Book Review: Along the Razor’s Edge

Along the Razor’s Edge by Rob J. Hayes
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

DISCLAIMER: I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the author in return for an honest and unbiased review. My thanks to Rob J. Hayes for giving me the chance to read and review this book.

At fifteen years old Eskara Helsene has suffered more pain and torture than most people experience in a full life. Taken from her home at the age of six and trained in the arts of Sourcery by the Orran Empire, she is one of the last Orran Sourcerers alive. The only problem is that she, along with her best friend and fellow Sourcerer Josef, are prisoners of the Terrelan Empire, captured at the end of a war the Orran’s lost and thrown into an inescapable prison known as The Pit. And without the Sources they need to fuel their magical abilities there appears to be no way for them to escape their predicament.

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Book Review: Sour Fruit

Sour Fruit by Eli Allison
My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars

Onion thinks she’s tough, but then she gets snatched from her foster home and finds out she’s not as tough as she thinks. Kidnapped by the de facto head of Kingston’s seedy underworld and promised to a trafficker known only as the Toymaker, she’s dragged around a city of non-citizens by Reah, the two of them chained together by circumstance and the explosive device implanted in Onion’s neck. Now Onion has three days to figure out an escape route, and all she has going for her is a smart mouth and never-say-die attitude.

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Book Review: Sixteenth Watch

Sixteenth Watch by Myke Cole
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

DISCLAIMER: I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher in return for an honest and unbiased review. My thanks to Angry Robot Books and NetGalley for giving me this opportunity.

Following a tragic encounter between American and Chinese forces that results in the death of her husband, Coast Guard Captain Jane Oliver is readying herself for a quiet retirement when the Commandant of the Guard offers her a role she’s not prepared for, leading and training the Coast Guard’s elite SAR-1 unit in preparation for the annual Boarding Action inter-service wargames. But this is a game where the outcome could very well end up starting the first ever lunar war, a war that won’t stay confined to the moon’s surface.

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Book Review: The Goblets Immortal

The Goblets Immortal by Beth Overmeyer
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

DISCLAIMER: I received an advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in return for an honest and unbiased review. My thanks to Flame Tree Press and NetGalley for giving me this opportunity.

In a world where magic is a thing to be feared, Aidan Ingledark is one of those rare individuals known as the Blest, with the power to summon or dispel objects at will. On the run from the authorities he inadvertently finds himself getting wrapped up in a quest to locate and retrieve the mystical Goblets Immortal for the mage Meraude, who in return has promised to help Aidan locate the family he believes he himself dispelled years before. Joining him on his quest is Slaine, a cursed slave girl who seems to have a few secrets of her own.

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Book Review: The Almanack

The Almanack by Martine Bailey
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

DISCLAIMER: I received an advanced reader copy of this title from the publishers and NetGalley in return for an honest and unbiased review. Many thanks to Black Thorn Books for giving me the chance to read and review this book.

In the year 1752 Tabitha Hart earns a living at the pleasure of whichever London gentlemen have the coin to pay for her time, but when her ailing mother calls her home to the village of Netherlea she has no choice but to reluctantly do as she is bid. Unfortunately, by the time she returns home it is too late. Despite the assurances of the village constable and the local doctor, Tabitha finds evidence in her mother’s almanack that suggests a darker truth to her death, and a mystery that threatens more darkness to come.

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